OUTLINE FOR CHAPTER 14 (Part 2)

Mixed ANOVAs

  1. Introduction
    1. The meaning of the term "mixed"
    2. The three most popular kinds of mixed ANOVAs
  2. Two-Way Mixed ANOVAs
    1. Labels for this kind of ANOVA
    2. Data layout and purpose
      1. The importance of being able to picture a study's factors, levels, and subjects
      2. Three research questions: two dealing with main effects and one with interaction
    3. Presentation of results
      1. The ANOVA summary table
        1. The "upper" and "lower" sections of the summary table
        2. The rule for determining where main and interaction effects belong
        3. The presence of two error terms
        4. Using information from the table
      2. Results presented within a passage of text
      3. Post hoc investigations
      4. More than one two-way mixed ANOVA in the same study
    4. Related issues
      1. The order in which the levels of the within-subjects factor are presented
      2. The sphericity assumption
      3. The distinction between statistical and practical significance
      4. The danger of an inflated Type I error rate
  3. Three-Way Mixed ANOVAs
    1. Distinguishing between the two kinds of three-way mixed ANOVAs
    2. Data layout and tables of means
    3. Presentation of results
      1. The ANOVA summary table
        1. What appears in the table's "upper" and "lower" sections
        2. Using information from the table
      2. Results presented within a passage of text
      3. Post hoc investigations
    4. Related issues
      1. Sphericity and other underlying assumptions
      2. The distinction between statistical and practical significance
      3. Planned comparisons
  4. A Final Comment
    1. Mixed ANOVAs with more than three factors
    2. Extrapolating what you know to these more complicated mixed ANOVAs

 

Copyright © 2012

Schuyler W. Huck
All rights reserved.

| Book Info | Author Info |

Site URL: www.readingstats.com

Top | Site Map
Site Design: John W. Taylor V